World celebrates, cyber-snoops cry as TLS 1.3 internet crypto approved

Forward-secrecy protocol comes with the 28th draft

By Kieren McCarthy in San Francisco 23 Mar 2018 at 21:53
 
It's beer o clock for sysadmins. Photo by SHutterstock

A much-needed update to internet security has finally passed at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), after four years and 28 drafts.

Internet engineers meeting in London, England, approved the updated TLS 1.3 protocol despite a wave of last-minute concerns that it could cause networking nightmares.

TLS 1.3 won unanimous approval (well, one “no objection” amid the yeses), paving the way for its widespread implementation and use in software and products from Oracle’s Java to Google’s Chrome browser.

The new protocol aims to comprehensively thwart any attempts by the NSA and other eavesdroppers to decrypt intercepted HTTPS connections and other encrypted network packets. TLS 1.3 should also speed up secure communications thanks to its streamlined approach.

The critical nature of the protocol, however, has meant that progress has been slow and, on occasion, controversial. This time last year, Google paused its plan to support the new protocol in Chrome when an IT schools administrator in Maryland reported that a third of the 50,000 Chromebooks he managed bricked themselves after being updating to use the tech.

Most recently, banks and businesses complained that, thanks to the way the new protocol does security, they will be cut off from being able to inspect and analyze TLS 1.3 encrypted traffic flowing through their networks, and so potentially be at greater risk from attack.

Unfortunately, that self-same ability to decrypt secure traffic on your own network can also be potentially used by third parties to grab and decrypt communications.

An effort to effectively insert a backdoor into the protocol was met with disdain and some anger by internet engineers, many of whom pointed out that it will still be possible to introduce middleware to monitor and analyze internal network traffic.

Nope

The backdoor proposal did not move forward, meaning the internet as a whole will become more secure and faster, while banks and similar outfits will have to do a little extra work to accommodate and inspect TLS 1.3 connections as required.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/03/23/tls_1_3_approved_ietf/

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